Project Cost Control

Project Cost Control

Jun 24, 2020 Bookkeeping 101 by ann

cost driver examples

A company likely incurs several other expenses that would not be included in the calculation of the prime cost, such as manager salaries or expenses for additional supplies needed to keep the factory running. These other expenses are considered manufacturing overhead expenses and are included in the calculation of the conversion cost.

In some accounting systems, cost drivers are almost irrelevant in determining the contribution. A fundamental difference between traditional costing and ABC costing is that ABC methods expand the number of indirect cost pools that can be allocated to specific products. The traditional method takes one pool of a company’s total overhead costs to allocate universally to all products. Indirect costs are costs that are not directly accountable to a cost object (such as a particular project, facility, function or product). But some overhead costs can be directly attributed to a project and are direct costs.

Activity-based costing is the most accurate, but it is also the most difficult and costly to implement. It is more suited to businesses with high overhead costs that manufacture products, rather than companies that offer services. Companies that manufacture a large number of different products prefer an activity-based system because it gives more accurate costs of each product. With activity-based allocation of overhead costs, it is easier to identify areas where expenses are being wasted on unprofitable products.

Activity-based costing (ABC) is a costing method that assigns overhead and indirect costs to related products and services. However, some indirect costs, such as management and office staff salaries, are difficult to assign to a product.

Choose Activity-based Categories

In activity-based costing (ABC), an activity cost driver influences the costs of labor, maintenance, or other variable costs. Cost drivers are essential in ABC, a branch of managerial accounting that allocates the indirect costs, or overheads, of an activity. Activity-based costing (ABC) is a costing method that identifies activities in an organization and assigns the cost of each activity to all products and services according to the actual consumption by each. This model assigns more indirect costs (overhead) into direct costs compared to conventional costing. Indirect costs are, but not necessarily, not directly attributable to a cost object.

Cost pool

Indirect costs are typically allocated to a cost object on some basis. In construction, all costs which are required for completion of the installation, but are not directly attributable to the cost object are indirect, such as overhead. In manufacturing, costs not directly assignable to the end product or process are indirect.

Direct labor costs are the same as those used in prime cost calculations. For example, direct labor hours are a driver of most activities in product manufacturing. If the cost of labor is high, this will increase the cost of producing all company products or services. If the cost of warehousing is high, this will also increase the expenses incurred for product manufacturing or providing services.

Traditional costing adds an average overhead rate to the direct costs of manufacturing products and is best used when the overhead of a company is low compared to the direct costs of production. Activity-based costing identifies all of the specific overhead operations related to the manufacture of each product.

An activity’s costs can be allocated to a particular production lot, and this makes activity-based costing an accurate way of allocating both direct and indirect costs. It is a method of computing costs associated with each product or line of production in a company based on the number of resources consumed by each activity.

What exactly is a cost driver?

A cost driver is the unit of an activity that causes the change in activity’s cost. cost driver is any factor which causes a change in the cost of an activity. — Chartered Institute of Management Accountants.

  • In activity-based costing (ABC), an activity cost driver influences the costs of labor, maintenance, or other variable costs.
  • Activity-based costing (ABC) is a costing method that assigns overhead and indirect costs to related products and services.

The conversion cost takes labor and overhead expenses into account, but not the cost of materials. Activity-based costing (ABC) is a method of assigning overhead and indirect costs—such as salaries and utilities—to products and services.

cost driver examples

Example of a Cost Allocation Based on Cost Drivers

Direct costs are directly attributable to the object and it is financially feasible to do so. In manufacturing or other non-construction industries the portion of operating costs that is directly assignable to a specific product or process is a direct cost.

How do you identify cost drivers?

To grow that number, additional machinery must enter the cost driver equation. The actual production and final product inspection are also common activity drivers that effect costs. When determining the value of each activity, the business must evaluate the cost on a per unit calculation, when possible.

Indirect costs do not vary substantially within certain production volumes or other indicators of activity, and so they may sometimes be considered to be fixed costs. Because prime cost only considers direct costs, it does not capture the total cost of production. As a result, the prime cost calculation can be misleading if indirect costs are relatively large.

Activity-Based Costing (ABC)

These may be costs for management, insurance, taxes, or maintenance, for example. Indirect costs are those for activities or services that benefit more than one project. Their precise benefits to a specific project are often difficult or impossible to trace. For example, it may be difficult to determine precisely how the activities of the director of an organization benefit a specific project.

cost driver examples

Direct labour and materials are relatively easy to trace directly to products, but it is more difficult to directly allocate indirect costs to products. Where products use common resources differently, some sort of weighting is needed in the cost allocation process. The cost driver is a factor that creates or drives the cost of the activity. For the activity of running machinery, the driver is likely to be machine operating hours, looking at labor, maintenance, and power cost during the period of machinery activity. Activity-based costing (ABC) is an accounting method that allocates both direct and indirect costs to business activities.

AccountingTools

As an activity-based costing example, consider Company ABC that has a $50,000 per year electricity bill. For the year, there were 2,500 labor hours worked, which in this example is the cost driver. Calculating the cost driver rate is done by dividing the $50,000 a year electric bill by the 2,500 hours, yielding a cost driver rate of $20. In a traditional system of accounting, the indirect costs or manufacturing overheads are allocated to the production cost based on a predetermined rate.

Direct costs are those for activities or services that benefit specific projects, for example salaries for project staff and materials required for a particular project. Because these activities are easily traced to projects, their costs are usually charged to projects on an item-by-item basis. Activity-based costing benefits the costing process by expanding the number of cost pools that can be used to analyze overhead costs and by making indirect costs traceable to certain activities.

byann